Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality & Mixed Reality: A Primer

Friday, April 29, 2016



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Housing: At the Edge of Another Huge Cliff?

By Elliott Wave International

Editor's note: You'll find a text version of the story below the video.

Time and again, we've said that financial markets do what they do despite the Federal Reserve.

When the central bank raised its key rate in December for the first time since 2006, many thought that would translate into higher mortgage rates.

Instead, mortgage rates are nearly as low as they've ever been. A Feb. 12 CNBC headline reads:

Mortgage rates could cross a record low

I recently talked to a real estate agent who suggested that today's low rates meant that it's a good time to buy a house.

But a historical review and other warning signs suggest just the opposite.

First, let's review a 2014 chart and comments from bankrate.com.

It's a common belief in real estate that house prices are correlated to interest rates. ...

The problem with this belief is that, well, it's not true. In fact, there's no strong relationship between house prices and interest rates, according to [a vice president for Fannie Mae].

Housing Hits the Skids: Stories of Interest - April 29, 2016

Taiwan Tech Firms Face Fallout From China / Apple Decline

Links below

$SPX - Are you ready?

The chart speaks for itself.
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Woe-Mart: The Retail Giant Walmart Has Faltered

Thursday, April 28, 2016

The era of "always low prices" no longer translates into always high profits. Learn what we think is behind the shift
By Elliott Wave International

Walmart founder Sam Walton said:

"There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else."

Never were those words felt more acutely for those on the Walmart payroll than right now. Reason being: Over the last year, the eponymous Walmart "customer" has, indeed, taken his business elsewhere, fueling a series of epic setbacks for the retail giant:

  • Store closures, layoffs, and the shuttering of its entire fleet of smaller "Express" locations across the U.S.
  • A near 40% decline in its stock (WMT) before hitting bottom in November 2015
  • Losing its status as the world's #1 retailer to Amazon
  • And -- the sour cherry on top: The first decline in annual revenue since Walmart went public 45 years ago

In the words of a March 31 Bloomberg: It's "the end of an era for Walmart."

Which leaves one question: How the heck does a big-box behemoth go from retail victor to re-fail victim?

Well, according to the mainstream experts, the main cause of Walmart's woes are many-fold, from falling oil prices - to - China's flailing economy - to - the extinction of the brick-and-mortar store - to - the biggest baddest culprit of all, the brawny greenback:

David Stockman: We Are Nearing the End, Investors Heading for Slaughter

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Greg Hunter Interviews David Stockman:
I think the world economy is plunging into an unprecedented deflation recession period of shrinkage that will bring down all the markets around the world that have been vastly overvalued as a result of this massive money printing and liquidity flow into Wall Street and other financial markets.

The CNBC interview referenced can be found here: 

Making Heads or Tails of This Market

By Elliott Wave International

As the books were closed on 2015, the Chicago Tribune reported:
"After a dismal stock finish to 2015, your natural conclusion might be: Why did I bother? 
"The Standard & Poor's 500 finished the year down 0.73%... The DJIA suffered its worst year since the 2008 financial crisis, declining 2.2%... Only the Nasdaq ended the year up... 5.7%... 
"...energy stocks as a group plunged 24%, and individually, many fell 30 or 40%. The energy plunge hurt unsuspecting retirees as master limited partnerships, or MLPs, dropped 36% -- a shock since analysts previously claimed that pipelines and other infrastructure in MLPs would be immune to an energy crash. Another retiree favorite for dividends -- utility funds -- lost 9% in 2015, according to Morningstar. 
"Bond funds weren't comforting either. The average bond fund investing in a broad mix declined about 2% … …junk bond funds have declined 4% on average, according to Morningstar."
We're only a few trading days into 2016 -- yet, so far, the new year isn't looking any more promising. Right now, you may be scrambling to make sense of the DJIA's huge tumble on Monday. (It was, in fact, the Dow's worst intraday start to the year since 1932 and worst full first day start since 2008.)

  More news....

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